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alexandrine

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ลองค้นหาคำในรูปแบบอื่นๆ เพื่อให้ได้ผลลัพธ์มากขึ้นหรือน้อยลง: -alexandrine-, *alexandrine*.
English-Thai: NECTEC's Lexitron-2 Dictionary [with local updates]
alexandrine    [N] โคลงกลอนที่มี 6 พยางค์

อังกฤษ-ไทย: ศัพท์บัญญัติราชบัณฑิตยสถาน [เชื่อมโยงจาก royin.go.th แบบอัตโนมัติและผ่านการปรับแก้]
alexandrineบทร้อยกรองอะเล็กซันดรีน [วรรณกรรม ๖ มี.ค. ๒๕๔๕]

English-Thai: HOPE Dictionary [with local updates]
alexandrine(แอลลิคซาน' ดริน) n. โคลงกลอนที่มี 12 พยางค์ -adj. เกี่ยวกับเมือง Alexandria

Thai-English-French: Volubilis Dictionary 1.0
นกแก้วโม่ง[n. exp.] (nok kaēo mōng) EN: Alexandrine Parakeet   FR: Perruche alexandre [f] ; Perruche à épaulettes [f]

CMU English Pronouncing Dictionary
ALEXANDRINE    AE2 L AH0 G Z AE1 N D R IY0 N
ALEXANDRINES    AE2 L AH0 G Z AE1 N D R IY0 N Z

Oxford Advanced Learners Dictionary (pronunciation guide only)
alexandrine    (n) (a2 l i g z a1 n d r ai n)
alexandrines    (n) (a2 l i g z a1 n d r ai n z)

German-English: TU-Chemnitz DING Dictionary
Großer Alexandersittich {m} [ornith.]Alexandrine Parakeet [Add to Longdo]

Result from Foreign Dictionaries (4 entries found)

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48 [gcide]:

  Verse \Verse\ (v[~e]rs), n. [OE. vers, AS. fers, L. versus a
     line in writing, and, in poetry, a verse, from vertere,
     versum, to turn, to turn round; akin to E. worth to become:
     cf. F. vers. See {Worth} to become, and cf. {Advertise},
     {Averse}, {Controversy}, {Convert}, {Divers}, {Invert},
     {Obverse}, {Prose}, {Suzerain}, {Vortex}.]
     1. A line consisting of a certain number of metrical feet
        (see {Foot}, n., 9) disposed according to metrical rules.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     Note: Verses are of various kinds, as {hexameter},
           {pentameter}, {tetrameter}, etc., according to the
           number of feet in each. A verse of twelve syllables is
           called an {Alexandrine}. Two or more verses form a
           stanza or strophe.
           [1913 Webster]
  
     2. Metrical arrangement and language; that which is composed
        in metrical form; versification; poetry.
        [1913 Webster]
  
              Such prompt eloquence
              Flowed from their lips in prose or numerous verse.
                                                    --Milton.
        [1913 Webster]
  
              Virtue was taught in verse.           --Prior.
        [1913 Webster]
  
              Verse embalms virtue.                 --Donne.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     3. A short division of any composition. Specifically: 
        [1913 Webster]
        (a) A stanza; a stave; as, a hymn of four verses.
            [1913 Webster]
  
     Note: Although this use of verse is common, it is
           objectionable, because not always distinguishable from
           the stricter use in the sense of a line.
           [1913 Webster]
        (b) (Script.) One of the short divisions of the chapters
            in the Old and New Testaments.
            [1913 Webster]
  
     Note: The author of the division of the Old Testament into
           verses is not ascertained. The New Testament was
           divided into verses by Robert Stephens [or Estienne], a
           French printer. This arrangement appeared for the first
           time in an edition printed at Geneva, in 1551.
           [1913 Webster]
        (c) (Mus.) A portion of an anthem to be performed by a
            single voice to each part.
            [1913 Webster]
  
     4. A piece of poetry. "This verse be thine." --Pope.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     {Blank verse}, poetry in which the lines do not end in
        rhymes.
  
     {Heroic verse}. See under {Heroic}.
        [1913 Webster]

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48 [gcide]:

  Alexandrine \Al`ex*an"drine\, n. [F. alexandrin.]
     A kind of verse consisting in English of twelve syllables.
     [1913 Webster]
  
           The needless Alexandrine ends the song,
           That, like a wounded snake, drags its slow length
           along.                                   --Pope.
     [1913 Webster]

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48 [gcide]:

  Alexandrine \Al`ex*an"drine\ (?; 277), a.
     Belonging to Alexandria; Alexandrian. --Bancroft.
     [1913 Webster]

From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:

  Alexandrine
      n 1: (prosody) a line of verse that has six iambic feet

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