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logbook

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ลองค้นหาคำในรูปแบบอื่นๆ เพื่อให้ได้ผลลัพธ์มากขึ้นหรือน้อยลง: -logbook-, *logbook*
English-Thai: Longdo Dictionary (UNAPPROVED version -- use with care )
logbookสมุดปูมเรือ เป็นสมุดสำหรับบันทึกเหตุการณ์ และรายละเอียดต่าง ๆ ในการเดินเรือไว้ ตามลำดับเวลา

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Visibility unlimited. Enter the weather in the logbook.มองเห็นไกลสุดลูกหูลูกตา จดสภาพอากาศลงสมุดบันทึก! Up (2009)
The logbook outside says that Krantz had one visitor yesterday. A Joe Daniels.คนที่เมื่อวานมาพบแครนซ์ ชื่อ โจ แดเนียล Prison Break: The Final Break (2009)
The logbook outside says that Krantz had one visitor yesterday.บัญทึกการเยื่ยม ระบุไว้ว่าแคร้นซ์มีคนมาเยี่ยม Free (2009)
You can have my logbook.คุณไปดูสมุดลงเวลาได้ The Bump in the Road (2012)
Like duplication sheets from a taxicab logbook.เหมือนใบก็อปปี้จาก\ สมุดบันทึกของแท็กซี่นะ The Survivor in the Soap (2013)
I tracked down the cab company from the logbook pages that Booth found in the victim's apartment.ฉันตามเรื่องไปที่\ บริษัทแท็กซี่ จากสมุดบันทึกที่บูธพบ ในอพาร์ทเม้นท์เหยื่อ The Survivor in the Soap (2013)
I'll start with the guard duty logbook.ผมจะเริ่มจากพวก รปภ. ที่ดูแลสมุดส่งกะ Welcome Back, Jim Gordon (2015)
A page is missing from this logbook.หน้านี้มันหายไปจากสมุดส่งกะ Welcome Back, Jim Gordon (2015)
We got a reliable guy, says it was you pulled the page from the guard duty logbook.เรามีคนที่น่าเชื่อถือ บอกว่านายดึงหน้านี้ออกไป จากสมุดส่งกะ Welcome Back, Jim Gordon (2015)
Nick found a logbook to that boat.นิคเจอสมุดบนเรือลำนั้น We All Fall Down (2016)

CMU English Pronouncing Dictionary
LOGBOOK    L AO1 G B UH2 K

Oxford Advanced Learners Dictionary (pronunciation guide only)
logbook    (n) (l o1 g b u k)
logbooks    (n) (l o1 g b u k s)

Japanese-English: EDICT Dictionary
付け方;付方[つけかた, tsukekata] (n) (1) way of affixing something; (2) way of recording something (to a logbook, etc.) [Add to Longdo]

Result from Foreign Dictionaries (2 entries found)

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48 [gcide]:

  Log \Log\, n. [Icel. l[=a]g a felled tree, log; akin to E. lie.
     See {Lie} to lie prostrate.]
     1. A bulky piece of wood which has not been shaped by hewing
        or sawing.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     2. [Prob. the same word as in sense 1; cf. LG. log, lock,
        Dan. log, Sw. logg.] (Naut.) An apparatus for measuring
        the rate of a ship's motion through the water.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     Note: The common log consists of the log-chip, or logship,
           often exclusively called the log, and the log line, the
           former being commonly a thin wooden quadrant of five or
           six inches radius, loaded with lead on the arc to make
           it float with the point up. It is attached to the log
           line by cords from each corner. This line is divided
           into equal spaces, called knots, each bearing the same
           proportion to a mile that half a minute does to an
           hour. The line is wound on a reel which is so held as
           to let it run off freely. When the log is thrown, the
           log-chip is kept by the water from being drawn forward,
           and the speed of the ship is shown by the number of
           knots run out in half a minute. There are improved
           logs, consisting of a piece of mechanism which, being
           towed astern, shows the distance actually gone through
           by the ship, by means of the revolutions of a fly,
           which are registered on a dial plate.
           [1913 Webster]
  
     3. Hence: The record of the rate of speed of a ship or
        airplane, and of the course of its progress for the
        duration of a voyage; also, the full nautical record of a
        ship's cruise or voyage; a log slate; a log book.
        [1913 Webster +PJC]
  
     4. Hence, generally: A record and tabulated statement of the
        person(s) operating, operations performed, resources
        consumed, and the work done by any machine, device, or
        system.
        [1913 Webster +PJC]
  
     5. (Mining) A weight or block near the free end of a hoisting
        rope to prevent it from being drawn through the sheave.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     6. (computers) A record of activities performed within a
        program, or changes in a database or file on a computer,
        and typically kept as a file in the computer.
        [PJC]
  
     {Log board} (Naut.), a board consisting of two parts shutting
        together like a book, with columns in which are entered
        the direction of the wind, course of the ship, etc.,
        during each hour of the day and night. These entries are
        transferred to the log book. A folding slate is now used
        instead.
  
     {Log book}, or {Logbook} (Naut.),
        (a) a book in which is entered the daily progress of a
            ship at sea, as indicated by the log, with notes on
            the weather and incidents of the voyage; the contents
            of the log board.
        (b) a book in which a log[4] is recorded.
  
     {Log cabin}, {Log house}, a cabin or house made of logs.
  
     {Log canoe}, a canoe made by shaping and hollowing out a
        single log; a dugout canoe.
  
     {Log glass} (Naut.), a small sandglass used to time the
        running out of the log line.
  
     {Log line} (Naut.), a line or cord about a hundred and fifty
        fathoms long, fastened to the log-chip. See Note under 2d
        {Log}, n., 2.
  
     {Log perch} (Zool.), an ethiostomoid fish, or darter
        ({Percina caprodes}); -- called also {hogfish} and
        {rockfish}.
  
     {Log reel} (Naut.), the reel on which the log line is wound.
        
  
     {Log slate}. (Naut.) See {Log board} (above).
  
     {Rough log} (Naut.), a first draught of a record of the
        cruise or voyage.
  
     {Smooth log} (Naut.), a clean copy of the rough log. In the
        case of naval vessels this copy is forwarded to the proper
        officer of the government.
  
     {To heave the log} (Naut.), to cast the log-chip into the
        water; also, the whole process of ascertaining a vessel's
        speed by the log.
        [1913 Webster]

From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:

  logbook
      n 1: a book in which the log is written

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